6 kitchen tools for the coffee addict

Essential kitchen tools to make the perfect cup of coffee as explained by Matt Chitharanjan and Namrata Asthana

A perfect cup of coffee is no fluke. It takes precision, time and effort. It’s as much of an art as it is a science. If you’re someone who’s paying close attention to your java and crave a consistent cup always, it’s time to put these simple kitchen tools to use. You may want to browse through Brew: Better Coffee at Home to up your coffee making skills.

1.    Kitchen Scale
Much like baking (Read about the Six baking essentials every kitchen must have), coffee brewing too relies on measuring the key ingredient. For instance, a French Press should ideally have 16-18 grams of ground coffee and a shot of espresso needs 18-20 grams. So weigh the ground for a brew-tiful outcome.

2.    Hot Water Kettle
Of course, you can use the stove to boil water but a kettle is a handier option for easy pouring.

3.    Kitchen Thermometer
Did you know pouring boiling hot water over the coffee ground ends up burning it? Ideally, wait for 10-30 seconds after the water boils, and measure it with a thermometer to make sure it reads between 91–94 degree Celsius.

4.    Coffee Grinder
Once ground, coffee beans start to lose flavour right away. Always grind the beans just before you plan to drink it.

5.    Chai channi/strainer
This little tool that’s mostly used for tea can come in handy if you’re just making the switch from instant to the real deal.

Start with coarsely grinding the roasted beans in the coffee grinder. Add hot water at 91–94 degree Celsius and let it brew for four to five minutes. Use the trusty channi to strain the concoction into a cup.

6.    Air Tight Container: Most of us tend to refrigerate the beans – a practice that does more harm than good. Moisture along with heat, light and oxygen is one of coffee’s biggest nemesis.

Storing in the fridge causes condensation on the beans that breaks down coffee.

For best results, beans should be stored in an airtight container away from the sunlight, in a cool and dry space. If the container is transparent or translucent, store it in a cabinet. And like all things perishable, coffee too has a “best before” window. Ideally, you should use up the beans within three weeks from the roasting date mentioned on the packaging. 

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Written By: Aditi Gaitonde Fernandes

Contributing Writer

Décor Ideas
28 March 2017

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